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29-May-13 1:00 PM  CST  

Study Shows Fever Reducing Drugs Do Not Help Children Recover Quicker From Infection 

Many times parents consult their doctor or pharmacist about using fever reducing drugs such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen to lower their child’s fever as well as help them feel better overall when fighting infection.  However, Professor Alison While of King’s College in London lead a study published in the May 2013 edition of The Journal of Pediatrics hoping to find out if “antipyretic” drugs got in the way of children’s immune system and response to immunity after vaccinations to treat various infections.  While and her colleagues found that antipyretics do not slow down a youth’s recovery time nor do antipyretics speed up the recovery period.    

Medical professionals suggest not giving kids a medication they truly do not need due to side effects and potential over dosing.  In addition, there is still continuous concern over parents giving their children more than one medication containing  acetaminophen which can cause serious patient harm or death if the young patient is given too much of the drugs active ingredient.    

Some doctors suggest letting a fever run its course, while others believe in giving fever reducing drugs for aches and joint pain associated with illness and infection.   Pharmacy technicians should refer questions about antipyretic medications to the pharmacist for patient counseling.  It should be noted that the patient’s doctor may need to be contacted for further advice if the child has special health concerns and conditions.           

 



Sources: 

 

1.  Stokes, Trevor.  “Fever Reducers Don’t Slow Children’s Recovery From Infection.”   
     Reuters.  Web.  20 May 2013.        

 

2.  While, Alison.  “Does the Use of Antipyretics in Children Who Have Acute Infections           
     Prolong Febrile Illness?  A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.”  The Journal of Pediatrics.  Web. 9 May 2013.  

 

3.  Rivas, Anthony.  “Fever Reducers Do Not Affect Children’s Recovery Time From Infection.”  
     Medical Daily.  Web.  19 May 2013. 

 

 

 

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For additional information on this Article article, please contact:

Jennifer O'Reilly

Source: Jennifer S. O' Reilly

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