11-Aug-14 10:00 AM  CST

High Blood Pressure In Midlife Age Linked To Declining Memory and Thinking Skills

According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, 67 million Americans have high blood pressure and it is called the ‘silent killer’ because it usually has no signs or symptoms.

            A new report released in JAMA Neurology discusses how high blood pressure in midlife is linked to a later decline in memory and thinking skills. Some highlights of the report remind patients that their blood pressure should run 120/80, which is in the normal range. Keeping blood pressure under control and at a normal range is even better for a person than having to treat high blood pressure once it starts.

            The longer an individual has a normal blood pressure range, the better their memory, thinking, and cognitive skills will be. Sometimes patients tend to ignore the very basics when it comes to keeping blood pressure in check even though the rules are very simple to follow and they will help keep other heart problems at bay. Harvard Health Publications suggests the following in keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range:

 

  • Remember to keep your weight at a healthy level.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables along with a heart-healthy diet.
  • Monitor your salt intake.
  • Exercise at least 5 times a week or exercise daily (if possible).
  • Limit alcohol intake.  The rule of thumb is one drink a day for women and two for men.
  • Eliminate smoking.

 

            Pharmacy technicians should encourage patients to check their blood pressure regularly on their own and at their doctor’s office. In addition, some pharmacies will check your blood pressure for you.  Patients and pharmacy customers can also buy their own blood pressure cuff and should check with their pharmacist on the best product to suit their needs.

 

 

 

 

           

Sources: 

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Facts. “High Blood Pressure Frequently Asked Questions.” CDC. Web. Date of Access:  11 Aug 2014. 

2. Merz, Beverly. “High Blood Pressure In Midlife Linked To Latter Decline In Memory, Thinking Skills.” Harvard Health Publications.  Web. Date of Access:  11 Aug 2014.


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Source: Jennifer S. O’Reilly  

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